A Guide for Law Students to Stay Productive during the Lockdown

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Has this lockdown left you distraught and a constant lingering to return to the hectic hustle and bustle of a law student? Are you now bored of mindlessly binge-watching endless shows and movies on your favourite OTT platform? Here is a guide for you that lists engaging activities every law student could take up during this lockdown.

1. Optimally utilize open access eBooks

The lockdown period has completely transformed how legal education is being imparted. Classroom interactions, interesting discussions and fun learning exercises have come to a complete halt. To compensate for this loss of education many forums and organisations are providing free access to popular e-books and databases. Some are also providing limited period discounts. Make good use of this time to expand your legal knowledge by benefitting from such sources.

You can also download many relevant materials for your reference in future. Below is a list of platforms wherein you can avail these services:

In addition to the academic readings, law students must also try getting valuable insights by reading books/ biographies/ autobiographies, written by/on the greatest legal minds. Below is a list of books, which every law student must read:

  • Before Memory Fades: An Autobiography by Fali S. Nariman
  • The Rule of law by Tom Bingham
  • Nani Palkhivala: The Courtroom Genius by Soli J. Sorabjee and Arvind P Datar
  • We, the People by Nani A. Palkhivala
  • How to argue and win every time by Gerry Spence

2. Attend Webinars and Workshops

The great lockdown has not impeded the reach of education. In fact, with the increased popularity of Webinars this reach has only expanded. The huge network of internet has removed all geographical barriers for attaining knowledge. Webinars are being organized by several organizations to discuss legal concepts and regular updates in the legal field. Prominent personalities are invited to talk about contemporary issues arising in the legal sphere. This brings a great opportunity for you to connect with the celebs of the legal fraternity. Some webinars are very interactive and also provide a platform for raising questions and voicing opinions. Following different blogging websites and being active on social media that post regularly on upcoming webinars will be immensely helpful. Also, do not forget to look out for several workshops that are being organized by different forums. As a mooting enthusiast, you could tune in to Memo Pundits and attend their result-oriented comprehensive workshops.

3. Undertake Online Certificate Courses

As a law student one lives a very hectic life and gets absolutely no time to invest in other activities. This lockdown comes as a blessing in disguise as it provides a golden opportunity to learn beyond the curriculum of a law school. Different forums have made an ample number of good certificate courses available online at a nominal or no cost. For instance, considering how integral moot courts are, as a law student, one can take up certificate courses on vocabulary, drafting and formatting, public speaking, etc. through the medium of such forums. If you are passionate and serious about mooting, you certainly realize the importance of a good memorial in a moot court competition. To learn the art of memorial making, you could register for the online certificate course on memorial making being offered by Memo Pundits, India’s first mooting school.

 

4. Undertake Online/ Work from Home Internships

In this time of human and economic crisis, the world is experiencing a huge financial shock. You can contribute to the failing economy by offering your services to different organizations by undertaking online/ work from home internships. These internships will also be a great learning experience for you and will glorify your resume simultaneously.

5. Write research papers, blogs, case comments for publication

Publications are very important for securing jobs and scholarships for higher education. Besides, the research that goes into publishing a good paper helps in understanding critical legal issues. You can invest your time in preparing well researched and quality write-ups. For every publication, it is important that apart from the research, the formatting is done well. You can refer to the Knowledge Centre on Memo Pundit’s website for some MS Word hacks for formatting that are common for publications and memorials.

6. Watch movies and documentaries on the legal subject

Movies and documentaries offer an engaging medium to understand the essence of any subject. Movies with brilliant cinematography, cast and plot usually take us on a time travel journey. Here is a list of some movies and documentaries one must watch as a law student:

  • Tokyo Trials
  • Twelve Angry Men 
  • Hot Coffee
  • Deliver Us from Evil

7. Participate in Online Moot Court Competitions

Mooting is a sought after and an integral activity amongst all law students, and rightly so. It is wonderful how, despite this lockdown, many reputed moot court organisers are using the virtual model for conducting moot court competitions and breaking barriers. You can register for such competitions and enjoy a virtual mooting experience.

8. Act as responsible citizens and contribute to society

While reaping the benefits of the above-mentioned suggestions, one must not forget to serve the society during this crisis. You should try taking small steps like volunteering and collaborating with the migrant workers to help them reach their home towns.

 

Regardless, stay home and stay safe!


About the Author: Yashi Agrawal is a 4th Year student at Maharashtra National Law University, Nagpur. She is currently holding the post of the Co-Convenor of the Moot court Committee. Ever since she came to know of it, she has been immensely lured by the world of mooting. She also has great experience in writing blogs for law students.

About the Editor: Shivangi Bajpai is a graduate from National Law University Odisha. As a fresher in law school, she was a part of an online law school magazine called Ergo (lawyergo.com) which was largely a peer-connect platform for students from law fraternity.  She has remarkable research skills and was a researcher in Henry Dunant Moot Court Competition, in her second year of law school.  She considers herself a solution-oriented individual making her an effective problem solver.

Disclaimer : We try to ensure that the information we post on memopundits.com is accurate. However, despite our best efforts, some of the content may contain errors. You can trust us, but please conduct your own checks too.

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